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Download Nuclear Theory: The Quasiparticle Method. 1968 by A.B. Migdal PDF

By A.B. Migdal

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4 Real Gases and Vapors In this section, the behavior and properties of real gases and vapors are described and equations of state are identified. An ideal gas is made up of particles that do not attract or repel one another. Real gases are made up of atoms or molecules that may attract one another strongly, like ammonia, water vapor, or sulfur dioxide. On the other hand, they may attract one another hardly at all, like helium. Real gases behave like ideal gases at “ordinary” temperatures and pressures.

On the other hand, they may attract one another hardly at all, like helium. Real gases behave like ideal gases at “ordinary” temperatures and pressures. However, if you heat them up and compress them to high pressure, then their behavior departs from ideal. If the molecules attract one another, a molecule in the center of the gas is attracted equally on all sides and its motion is not affected. For a molecule, which is very close to the wall of container, exerts lees force on the wall, due to the intermolecular attractive forces with other molecules.

The amount of heat that is added to complete the melting is called the Heat of Fusion and is normally expressed on per unit mass or per unit mole basis. Once the entire solid is melted the temperature increases again in proportion to the amount of heat input. Note that the increase in temperature per unit heat input for the solid and liquid are not usually equal. As the substance continues to heat up, at some point the liquid will start to vaporize. Once it starts to vaporize, the temperature remains constant until all of the liquid is vaporized.

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