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Download Law-Making and Society in Late Elizabethan England: The by David Dean PDF

By David Dean

David Dean's ebook bargains the 1st specified account of the final Elizabethan parliaments. studying a variety of social and financial concerns, legislation reform, spiritual and political issues, Law-Making and Society in past due Elizabethan England addresses the significance of parliament either as a political occasion and as a legislative establishment. David Dean attracts on an array of neighborhood, company and private records to reinterpret the legislative background of the interval and in doing so, achieve a deeper realizing of many features of Elizabethan historical past.

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Additional info for Law-Making and Society in Late Elizabethan England: The Parliament of England, 1584-1601

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BL, Stowe MS 362, ff. 14-16 (Townshend, Journal, p. 19), speaking to a bill on wills. Salts. MSS, VII, 5 4 2 ; BL, Lans. M S 7 3 / 7 8 , f. 1 3 0 . D. Amussen, An Ordered Society: Gender and Class in Early Modern England (Oxford, 1988), and her article in AJ. Fletcher and J. U. F. McManus, Half Humankind: Contexts and Texts of the Controversy about Women in England 1540-1640 (Urbana, 1985). 16 Law-making and society in late Elizabethan England gendered assumptions foremost in the minds of the legislators.

Speaker Coke was in no doubt: those in favour were to go out 72 73 74 75 D'Ewes, pp. 629, 635-6. It was engrossed unopposed, BL, Egerton MS 2222, f. 50. TCD, MS 1045, ff. 83, 87; D'Ewes, pp. 361, 363. BL, Lans. MS 43/72, f. 170v. BL, Stowe MS 362, ff. 14v, 16-16v (Townshend, Journal, pp. 18, 20); D'Ewes, p. 589. Initiation and procedure 27 because 'the Inventor that will have a new Law is to go out and bring it in; and they that are for the Law in possession must keep the House, for they sit to continue it'.

On occasion this was perceived as threatening the chances of government business. On others, MPs' insistence that they could initiate discussion on religion, foreign policy and other 'matters of state' was seen as exceeding their authority, at least by the Queen. Law-making was not, therefore, without constitutional significance. The competing and conflicting interests 44 45 46 47 BL, Egerton M S 2 2 2 2 , f, 2 4 4 ; D'Ewes, p. 6 3 1 . For an illuminating discussion see K. Thomas, 'Cases of Conscience in Seventeenth-Century England', in J.

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